The Inside Poop on Outdoor Crappers

a  darn good outhouse . . . .

welcome to Custer’s Crapper . . . .

The latest in outhouse technology, this charming creation by Mathisen Construction is ready for a ride to the Big Horns to offer all the comforts of home to the rugged individualists willing to risk tires, shocks, axles and much more on the roadless realm to be “alone in the wilderness.”  It will be the anchor for a developing cabin site, making it much easier for all us idle “hangers-on” to spend time looking over the progress, which is very hard to do with no “facilities” (nobody wants to despoil this pristine wilderness with Charmin blossoms behind every tree).

let there be light . . . .

let there be light . . . .

To avoid being shut away in the dark, which is a fearful experience in an outhouse, these nifty windows let in light–what a great idea!

let the cool breezes blow . . . .

let the cool breezes blow . . . .

Window ventilation slots with screens and a door you can latch to keep the cruel winter snows from drifting down upon your head (and the toilet seat) are state-of-the-art!

no splinters here! . . . .

no splinters here! . . . .

Gone are the days of rough lumber benches with a crude opening that may or may not fit your derriere.  And to control flies and other unwanted critters, a lid to seal the deal.

t.p. lock box . . . .

A.W. lock box . . . .

Imagine our surprise when we discovered a special bin for the toilet paper!

the proverbial A.W. . . . .

the proverbial A.W. . . . .

This innovation left us breathless.  Having reached for a roll of toilet paper covered with dust, cobwebs, fly specks and God knows what else, this is a serious improvement in outhouse design and construction.

technological wonders . . . .

technological wonders . . . .

Equipped with gas mask, smoke alarm, bowl brush, plunger (???) and a variety of gizmos for bemusement as well as beneficial application, the list of options grows long when one has time to think about it.  The only item missing is the Monkey Ward Catalog, but that accessory harkens back to “the good old days.”

the Roosevelt . . . .

the Roosevelt . . . .

Built in the 1930’s and so named for FDR who commissioned all sorts of make work projects during the Great Depression, this fine specimen has endured through the years and functions as well in our back yard today as when it was constructed.  Designed to last, these old outhouses still stand as sentinels of the past.

the concrete throne . . . .

the concrete throne . . . .

Advances in technology here!  This modern facility includes a concrete floor and throne with a hardwood lid that opens and closes automatically.  A wooden arm extends over the edge of the toilet lid and is threaded with a rope that glides through a metal pulley near the ceiling.  The rope is attached to the door and is designed so that when it is time to exit the domain, one has to only open the door, causing the rope attached to the lid to lift the wooden arm, closing the throne behind you.  Nice, eh?  Brings back memories of the days when, as children, we delighted in loading the lid, skinnying out the door without triggering the arm to lift, and when the next occupant opened the door –BAM!  The heavy hardwood lid would slam like a rifle shot and render the hapless soul incapable of holding back.  But I digress.

no curtain? . . . .

no curtain? . . . .

This fine example of early day crappers is a testament to the grit and fortitude of our ancestors.  Clawing through snow, rain, thunder, lightning and wild animals for the privilege of relieving oneself in this fashion took more than just imagination!

 

 

 

 

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